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Early Years (under 8)

Outdoor time.

The Chief Medical Officers physical activity guidelines for children aged five and over say that:

  • All children and young people should engage in moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity for at least 60 minutes and up to several hours every day
  • Vigorous intensity activities, including those that strengthen muscle and bone, should be incorporated at least three days a week
  • All children and young people should minimise the amount of time spent being sedentary (sitting) for extended periods

How to get them active

Examples of physical activity that should be encouraged include:

Moderate intensity physical activities (which cause children to get warmer and breathe harder and their hearts to beat faster but they can still carry on a
conversation) such as:

  • Adventure time - Bike riding, playground/park activities

Vigorous intensity physical activities (which cause children to get warmer and breathe much harder and their hearts to beat rapidly making it more difficult to carry on a
conversation) such as:

  • Outdoor time - Fast running, sports such as swimming or football

Adventure time.

Physical activities that strengthen muscles and bones, involving using body weight or working against a resistance, such as:

  • Outdoor time - Playground equipment such as the monkey bars, hopping and skipping
  • Play time - Sports such as gymnastics or tennis

Download the physical activity guidelines for children and young people (5-18 years) here.

Keep it simple

For more simple ideas to help get children active, using little or no equipment, download the leaflets below.

Time to Dance

Singing and dancing is a great way for you and your child to get active and have some fun together!

Websites such as YouTube have lots of great short films available featuring songs with actions for children.

Songs with actions for children